Jack Reacher series of novels by Lee Child

If you’re as enthralled by the Jack Reacher movie as I was, then here’s the Jack Reacher series of novels in order.  Note: you don’t have to read them in order, but sometimes you miss the full text of a novel if you haven’t read the previous works.

Killing Floor by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 1

Killing Floor by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 1

Jack Reacher No. 1:  Killing Floor

Plot Summary:

From its chilling opening page, you know all is not well in Margrave, Georgia. The sleepy, forgotten town hasn’t seen a crime in decades, but within the span of three days it witnesses events that leave everyone stunned. An unidentified man is found beaten and shot to death on a lonely country road. The police chief and his wife are butchered on a quiet Sunday morning. Then a bank executive disappears from his home, leaving his keys on the table and his wife frozen with fear. The easiest suspect is Jack Reacher – an outsider, a man just passing through. But Reacher is not just any drifter. He is a tough ex-military policeman, trained to think fast and act faster. He has lived with and hunted the worst: the hard men of the American military gone bad. When authorities learn the first victim was someone from Reacher’s past, and he cannot convince them of his innocence, his patient self-defense becomes a raging crusade of revenge. With two cops who believe in him – a thoughtful black detective and a woman named Roscoe – he closes in on a ruthless conspiracy hiding behind Margrave’s rural charm. But closing in on him is a team of killers so careful and efficient they are almost invisible. Step by step, the two teams circle – waiting to see which will be the first to walk onto the killing floor.

 

Die Trying by Lee Chld, Jack Reacher series No. 2

Die Trying by Lee Chld, Jack Reacher series No. 2

Jack Reacher No. 2:  Die Trying

Plot Summary:

In Die Trying, Reacher gets tangled up in a kidnapping he’s not supposed to have anything to do with. Gallantly stepping in to help a beautiful woman on crutches who is struggling with her dry cleaning, he puts himself in exactly the wrong place at the wrong time. The woman is FBI agent Holly Johnson,andoutside her dry cleaner’s she, and Reacher along with her, is forced at gunpoint into the backseat of a car (which has been stolen in the opening scene in a breathtakingly sudden explosion of violence).

Their kidnappers are members of a highly organized neo-Nazi militia conglomerate who want Holly because she is very important to some very important people in the American government, and they have big plans to use her as a bargaining chip in a plot to mount a massive political insurrection. They really don’t want any part of Reacher, but they don’t quite understand that until they get him back to their Montana compound.

On the trip there, several days’ journey in the back of a stolen delivery truck, Reacher’s anger has time to fester and build. He has several chances to escape, but he is too calculating to take unnecessary risks. When these moments arrive, the pent-up violence waiting to be released swells off the page. But again and again, you have to wait — until finally the driver of the truck steals into the barn where Reacher and Holly are chained to the wall in facing horse stalls for the night. He takes advantage of her injury and the fact that she has only one free hand to viciously beat her into submission, intent on having his way with her. Reacher is ten feet away and bound by a heavy iron chain looped through a ring in the wall. After desperately defending herself and almost defeating her assailant, Holly is conquered. The moment has arrived.

She undid the top button. Reacher counted: one. The driver leered down. Her hand slid to the next button. Reacher tightened his grip again. She undid the second button. Reacher counted: two. Her hand slid down to the third button. Reacher turned square-on to face the rear wall of his stall and took a deep breath. Turned his head and watched over his shoulder. Holly undid the third button. Dark peach brassiere. Skimpy and lacy. The driver shuffled from foot to foot. Reacher counted: three. He exhaled right from the bottom of his lungs. Holly’s hand slid down to the fourth button. Reacher took a deep breath, the deepest breath of his life. He tightened his hold on the chain until his knuckles shone white. Holly undid the fourth button. Reacher counted: four. Her hand slid down. Paused a beat. Waited. Undid the fifth button. Her suit fell open. The driver leered down and made a small sound. Reacher jerked back and smashed his foot into the wall. Right under the iron ring. He smashed his weight backward against the chain, two hundred and twenty pounds of coiled fury exploding against the force of his kick. Splinters of damp wood burst out of the wall. The old planks shattered. The bolts tore right out of the timber. Reacher was hurled backward. He swarmed up to his feet, his chain whipping and flailing angrily behind him.”Five!” he screamed.

What Reacher does to the hapless driver is pretty satisfying, all in all, but it’s nothing compared with what happens when his captors get him back to Montana, where a ruthless psychopath named Beau Borken, a huge, hideous, brilliant monster of a man, lives like a god, ruling by fear over hundreds of militia men and women. The FBI, struggling to piece together the kidnapping from scant evidence, believes that Reacher has masterminded the entire thing and has tracked him back to Montana. Borken has some awful plans for both Reacher and Holly, as well as for the country as a whole, but when Reacher gets loose in the compound (it’s only a matter of time, but you’ll be fidgeting as you wait for it), the pure, unthinkably brutal mayhem he unleashes changes everybody’s priorities.

Tripwire by Lee Child, Jack Reachers series No. 3

Tripwire by Lee Child, Jack Reachers series No. 3

Jack Reacher No. 3:  Tripwire

Plot Summary:

The third Jack Reacher adventure finds the ex-military policeman living in Key West, digging pools by day and working as a bouncer by night. After three months in the islands, Reacher is settling in to his relaxed lifestyle and thinking of staying for good. But his idyll is interrupted when he is approached twice in one day for information on one Jack Reacher, first by an amiable private investigator named Costello, then by a pair of hulking thugs hot on Costello’s trail. Reacher sidesteps their questions by denying his identity, but is drawn into matters after Costello is found dead, the victim of a savage beating apparently administered by the two thugs.

Anxious to know what inspired this violence, Reacher tracks the detective to New York, where he discovers Costello was hired by a “Mrs. Jacob.” Visiting Mrs. Jacob’s home, a surprised Reacher is pleased to learn Mrs. Jacob is actually the former Jodie Garber, daughter of the recently deceased General Garber, Reacher’s mentor and commanding officer when he worked with the military police. Jodie informs Reacher that her father was trying to contact him to request his assistance in uncovering the truth about a Vietnam-era MIA.

Reacher agrees to finish the job Garber started, bringing him into direct conflict with the men who killed Costello and with their boss, “Hook” Hobie, a horribly scarred master criminal who is only hours away from making the biggest score of his life. Hobie has a dark past, the details of which will upset his current operation should they come to light. Reacher’s investigations put him on acollisioncourse with the sadistic Hobie, who, as his nickname implies, sports a metal hook on his right hand. Both Reacher and Hobie pursue their agendas, inching ever closer to their inevitable conflict at book’s end, a bloody battle that leaves only one of them standing.

Running Blind by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 4

Running Blind by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 4

Jack Reacher No. 4:  Running Blind (aka The Visitor)

Plot Summary:

Jack Reacher, the wandering folk hero of Child’s superb line of thrillers (Tripwire, etc.), faces a baffling puzzle in his latest adventure: who is the exceptionally crafty villain murdering women across the country, leaving the naked bodies in their bathtubs (which are filled with army camouflage green paint), escaping the scenes and leaving no trace of evidence? The corpses show no cause of death and Reacher’s sole clue is that all the victims thus far were sexually harassed while serving in the military. There’s got to be some sort of grand scheme behind the killings, but with no physical evidence, FBI agents bumble around until they finally question Reacher, a former military cop who handled each of the dead women’s harassment cases. After Reacher convinces investigators he’s innocent, they–curiously–ask him to stay on as a case consultant. Reacher doesn’t like the idea–he’s too much of a lone wolf–but he has little choice. The feds threaten him and his girlfriend, high-powered Manhattan attorney Jodie Jacob, with all sorts of legal entanglements if he doesn’t help. So Reacher joins the FBI team and immediately attacks the feds’ approach, which is based solely on profiling. Then he breaks out on his own, pursuing enigmatic theories and hunches that lead him to a showdown with a truly surprising killer in a tiny village outside Portland, Ore.

Echo Burning by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 5

Echo Burning by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 5

Jack Reacher No. 5:  Echo Burning

Plot Summary:

Jack Reacher, the vagabond freelance lawman who never hesitates to stick his nose into private business, takes his lively act to Texas, embroiling himself in what starts as a messy domestic dispute before turning far more ominous. The rugged former army cop comes to the aid of Carmen Greer, who picks him up on the side of the road one morning outside Lubbock, then asks him to kill her abusive husband. Sloop Greer is getting out of prison in a few days, and Carmen fears he will start beating her again. Reacher declines, but agrees to protect Carmen, hiring on as a cowhand at the couple’s remote ranch in Echo County, Tex., far outside Pecos. Within hours of Sloop’s return from prison, where he was serving time for tax evasion, violence strikes. But the victim isn’t Carmen; it’s Sloop. He’s found shot dead, and Carmen is arrested. End of story? Hardly. Most wandering heroes would move on at this point, but not Reacher. He begins taking a hard look at both Carmen and Sloop’s past, as well as local history. What he finds ugly secrets, human suffering, political evil is repulsive to a man who’s been around as many blocks as Reacher.

 

Without Fail by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 6

Without Fail by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 6

Jack Reacher No. 6:  Without Fail

Plot Summary:

When the newly elected Vice President’s life is threatened, the Secret Service runs to nomadic soldier-of-fortune Jack Reacher (Echo Burning, 2001, etc.) in this razor-sharp update of The Day of the Jackal and In the Line of Fire that’s begging to be filmed. Why Reacher? Because M.E. Froelich, head of the VP’s protection team, was once a colleague and lover of his late brother Joe, who’d impressed her with tales of Jack’s derring-do as an Army MP. Now Froelich and her Brooks Brothers-tailored boss Stuyvesant have been receiving a series of anonymous messages threatening the life of North Dakota Senator/Vice President-elect Brook Armstrong. Since the threats may be coming from within the Secret Service’s own ranks-if they aren’t, it’s hard to see how they’ve been getting delivered-they can’t afford an internal investigation. Hence the call to Reacher, who wastes no time in hooking up with his old friend Frances Neagley, another Army vet turned private eye, first to see whether he can figure out a way to assassinate Armstrong, then to head off whoever else is trying. It’s Reacher’s matter-of-fact gift to think of everything, from the most likely position a sniper would assume at Armstrong’s Thanksgiving visit to a homeless shelter to the telltale punctuation of one of the threats, and to pluck helpers from the tiny cast who can fill the remaining gaps because they aren’t idiots or stooges.

Persuader by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 7

Persuader by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 7

Jack Reacher No. 7, Persuader

Plot Summary:

Retired Army MP Jack Reacher embarks upon his seventh case when he’s fingered by the FBI to infiltrate a crime syndicate and extricate a missing female undercover agent. In a breakneck first chapter that leaves the listener gasping, Jack whisks the crime boss’s college-age son from an attempted kidnapping and grudgingly agrees to rush the terrified kid home to daddy. But insinuating Jack into the family compound was the goal all along-the FBI staged the kidnapping to put him undercover. Jack has 15 days to crack the case while he prowls for clues at an isolated coastal Maine estate, occasionally slipping off for an increasingly sizzling rendezvous with his sexy (female) FBI contact. An eye-for-an-eye kind of guy, Jack whittles away at an edgy entourage of murderers, molesters, and thieves like picking off steroid-plumped birds on a wire.

 

 

The Enemy by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 8

The Enemy by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 8

Jack Reacher No. 8:  The Enemy

Plot Summary:

The eighth Jack Reacher tale (Persuader, 2003, etc.) is a fabulously suspenseful prequel that reveals Reacher’s character as he uncovers a homicidal cabal of military officers. On New Year’s Eve 1990, Military Police Major Jack Reacher gets a call: a general is dead, evidently of a heart attack while having sex in a seedy motel near an isolated North Carolina Army base. The general and three subordinates had just arrived in the US from Germany and were en route to Fort Irwin, California. Why did the general take a 289-mile detour for a sleazy fling? Reacher crosses the road to a strip joint where he searches for the prostitute whose favors brought on the heart attack. After noticing other soldiers in the club, Reacher avenges a battered prostitute by beating up the joint’s owner. Back at the base, Reacher gets another call: the general’s wife has been bludgeoned to death during an apparent burglary of their Virginia home. Reacher teams up with Lieutenant Summer, an attractive, coolly competent black female MP, but finds few clues at the scene. Soon after, the hideously mutilated body of a Special Forces soldier whom Reacher saw at the strip joint is found. Not only had this soldier signed a complaint against Reacher about the fight at the club, but also his fatal injuries could have been inflicted only by a man of Reacher’s strength and height. The Special Forces think Reacher killed him and have marked him for death. Then, suspense at its peak, Child takes Reacher and his brother Joe to Paris to visit their dying mother. Child merely touches on the mother-son relationship that has had so much to do with the rootless, brooding action hero Reacher has become. Then it’s back to the action:another corpse, and uneasy undercurrents in Army bureaucracy that tell Reacher the post-USSR peace dividend will be anything but. Child has turned away from formulaic high-jinks to explore his characters instead: The result? His best so far..

One Shot by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 9

One Shot by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 9

Jack Reacher No. 9, One Shot

Plot Summary:

Six shots. Five dead. One heartland city thrown into a state of terror. But within hours the cops have it solved: a slam-dunk case. Except for one thing. The accused man says: You got the wrong guy. Then he says: Get Reacher for me. And sure enough, from the world he lives in – no phone, no address, no commitments – ex-military investigator Jack Reacher is coming. In Lee Child’s thriller, Reacher’s arrival will change everything – about a case that isn’t what it seems, about lives tangled in baffling ways, about a killer who missed one shot – and by doing so give Jack Reacher one shot at the truth.  The gunman worked from a parking structure just thirty yards away – point-blank range for a trained military sniper like James Barr. His victims were in the wrong place at the wrong time. But why does Barr want Reacher at his side? There are good reasons why Reacher is the last person Barr would want to see. But when Reacher hears Barr’s own words, he understands. And a slam-dunk case explodes.  Soon Reacher is teamed with a young defense lawyer who is working against her D.A. father and dueling with a prosecution team that has an explosive secret of its own. Like most things Reacher has known in life, this case is a complex battlefield. But, as always, in battle, Reacher is at his best.” Moving in the shadows, picking his spots, Reacher gets closer and closer to the unseen enemy who is pulling the strings. And for Reacher, the only way to take him down is to know his ruthlessness and respect his cunning – and then match him shot for shot.

The Hard Way by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series no. 10

The Hard Way by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series no. 10

Jack Reacher No. 10, The Hard Way

Plot Summary:

In this slick, swift, sexy thriller, it’s Jack Reacher, the thinking man’s Rambo, against a band of hand-picked, combat-hardened, armed-to-the-teeth, ex-special services guys, but, hey, there are only eight of them. We’re talking Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, Green Beret, British SAS and the like, all now free from their savage services but never from their training. Which is to render people dead without wasted motion or mercy. They’re commanded by an ex-U.S. Army colonel who has formed these wacko killers into a group called Operational Security Consultants (read mercenaries), and who may be considerably off-kilter himself. Reacher comes into contact with them all by happenstance. Sitting in a favorite cafe, sipping espresso, he notices something odd about a certain parked car-and is noticed noticing. What he’s seen, it turns out, is a car full of ransom money. It belongs to ex-Colonel Edward Lane, whose wife and step-child-Kate and Jade-have been kidnapped. In Reacher’s world, however, it’s a truism that kidnappings are not always what they appear. Kate, Reacher soon learns, is not Lane’s first wife. Nor is she his first wife to be kidnapped. Reacher learns this from a young woman with vengeance on her mind. For four years, Patti Joseph, the first Mrs. Lane’s sister, has kept Lane under personal surveillance, convinced that he murdered her sister, intent on making him pay for it. From private eye Lauren Pauling-green-eyed and elegant-Reacher learns more about Lane, none of it redeeming. In and out of bed, Reacher and Pauling form an effective team, mounting a search-and-destroy operation that eventually takes them across the Atlantic to what amounts to an English O.K. Corral.

Bad Luck and Trouble by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series no. 11

Bad Luck and Trouble by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series no. 11

Jack Reacher No. 11, Bad Luck and Trouble

Plot Summary:

From a helicopter high above the empty California desert, a man is sent free-falling into the night…. In Chicago, a woman learns that an elite team of ex–army investigators is being hunted down one by one…. And on the streets of Portland, Jack Reacher—soldier, cop, hero—is pulled out of his wandering life by a code that few other people could understand. From the first shocking scenes in Lee Child’s explosive new novel, Jack Reacher is plunged like a knife into the heart of a conspiracy that is killing old friends…and is on its way to something even worse.

A decade postmilitary, Reacher has an ATM card and the clothes on his back—no phone, no ties, and no address. But now a woman from his old unit has done the impossible. From Chicago, Frances Neagley finds Reacher, using a signal only the eight members of their elite team of army investigators would know. She tells him a terrifying story—about the brutal death of a man they both served with. Soon Reacher is reuniting with the survivors of his old team, scrambling to raise the living, bury the dead, and connect the dots in a mystery that is growing darker by the day. The deeper they dig, the more they don’t know: about two other comrades who have suddenly gone missing—and a trail that leads into the neon of Vegas and the darkness of international terrorism.

For now, Reacher can only react. To every sound. Every suspicion. Every scent and every moment. Then Reacher will trust the people he once trusted with his life—and take this thing all the way to the end. Because in a world of bad luck and trouble, when someone targets Jack Reacher and his team, they’d better be ready for what comes right back at them…

Nothing to Lose by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 12

Nothing to Lose by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 12

Jack Reacher No. 12, Nothing to Lose

Plot Summary:

At the start of bestseller Child’s solid 12th Jack Reacher novel (after Bad Luck and Trouble), the ex-military policeman hitchhikes into Colorado, where he finds himself crossing the metaphorical and physical line that divides the small towns of Hope and Despair. Despair lives up to its name; all Reacher wants is a cup of coffee, but what he gets is attacked by four thugs and thrown in jail on a vagrancy charge. After he’s kicked out of town, Reacher reacts in his usual manner-he goes back and whips everybody’s butt and busts up the town’s police force. In the process, he discovers, with the help of a good-looking lady cop from Hope, that a nearby metal processing plant is part of a plan that involves the war in Iraq and an apocalyptic sect bent on ushering in the end-time. With his powerful sense of justice, dogged determination and the physical and mental skills to overcome what to most would be overwhelming odds, Jack Reacher makes an irresistible modern knight-errant.

 

Gone Tomorrow by Lee Child, Jack Reacher No. 13

Gone Tomorrow by Lee Child, Jack Reacher No. 13

Jack Reacher No. 13, Gone Tomorrow

Plot Summary:

Jack Reacher (Nothing to Lose, 2008, etc.), latter-day gunslinger and nomad, finds his latest killing fields in New York City. Reacher is riding the subway, riding it to nowhere, or anywhere, his destinations of choice these days. Having decided that the constraints of military life have slipped past burdensome into painfully boring, he’s packed in a long and lustrous career. Now he takes his missions where he finds them, and he’s about to find a beauty. It’s the wee hours, the passenger population sparse, when Reacher spots a woman seated some 30 feet away who intrigues him-better put, she causes the hairs on the back of his neck to rise. Not because she’s particularly menacing. Actually, most would construe her as a 40-year-old paradigm of harmlessness, but Reacher has become aware that she conforms precisely to the 11-point “list of behavioral indicators” passed on to him years back by Israeli counterintelligence. In short, Reacher’s convinced he’s looking at a suicide bomber. Is he, isn’t he, what will happen if he confronts her? Thereby hangs the tale, and before it’s fleshed out, Reacher will have had issues with an inimical variety: the NYPD, the FBI, an ambitious would-be U.S. senator with festering secrets, a pair of ferocious Afghan ladies, as programmed to kill as other ladies are to lunch, and an extended line of miscellaneous miscreants dumb enough to engage him. No one kicks butt as entertainingly as Reacher.

61 Hours by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 14

61 Hours by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 14

Jack Reacher No. 14, 61 Hours

Plot Summary:

When a bus full of seniors spins out of control, the obvious recourse is to reach out for Reacher (Gone Tomorrow, 2009, etc.). On its way to Mt. Rushmore, a bus carrying a load of elderly tourists, plus a ringer, loses to a patch of ice. Reacher’s the ringer. Some 30 years younger than the average age of his fellow passengers, he’s among them by happenstance, a kind of hitchhiker. Reacher-that inveterate nomad, indefatigable Rambo and Galahad for all seasons-finds himself once more in the midst of an authentic mess. Banged up and inoperable, the bus has come to rest in Bolton, S.D., a town buried in snow and heaps of trouble. There’s the biker gang living on its outskirts, making crystal meth. There’s a repellent figure named Plato, a racketeering lowlife, whose philosophy is kill everything on the theory that if it lives, whatever it is, it might at some point have a negative Platonic effect. And then there’s grandmotherly Janet Salter. Sweet, smart, elegant and pound for pound as brave as Reacher, she’s a retired librarian, from Oxford’s Bodleian, no less. She’s also a witness to a grisly murder. Desperate to keep her alive, the Bolton PD has begun to think it might not be able to. Andrew Peterson, the department’s deputy chief, wants to ask Reacher for help. And when his reluctant boss asks why, he says, “I think he’s the sort of guy who sees things five seconds before the rest of the world.” Well, he’s right about that, of course, but even Reacher will be shaken by some of what he sees before exiting Bolton en route to Nowhere, his country of choice.

Worth Dying For by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 15

Worth Dying For by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 15

Jack Reacher No. 15, Worth Dying For

Plot Summary:

Whatever business Jack Reacher has in Virginia will have to wait till the world’s most distractible soldier of fortune cleans up the mess he’s stumbled into amid the cornfields of the Midwest.

After hitchhiking as far as Nebraska, Reacher minds his own business precisely long enough for the sozzled doctor sharing a hotel bar with him to get a call from a patient with a nosebleed. Forget about ignoring her, Reacher tells the startled medico. If she’s had nosebleeds recently, she may well be taking aspirin that’s thinned her blood and made it likely that she’ll keep on bleeding. Better to have Reacher drive him to Eleanor Duncan’s house so that he can see whether her husband’s been beating her. In the end, Eleanor’s nosebleed turns out to be inconsequential—it’s not even Seth Duncan who’s beaten her this time—but his perverse, aggressive, utterly characteristic stint as the good Samaritan pulls Reacher into the orbit of Seth’s father Jacob and Seth’s uncles Jasper and Jonas. Because they’re a tight-knit family, they don’t plan to take Reacher’s interference lying down. And because they’re engaged in criminal enterprise, their clients, already putting pressure on them for a mysteriously delayed delivery coming down from Canada, plan to go after this interloper themselves. In a flash, the ex-Army cop is the subject of a manhunt by the Duncans’ thugs, their Italian client’s thugs, the Italian’s Lebanese client’s thugs and the Lebanese’s Iranian clients’ thugs. With so many strong-arm types flooding the prairie, there are plenty of opportunities for violence, treachery and double-crossing—think of a Nebraska remake of A Fistful of Dollars with an international cast—and Child (61 Hours, 2010, etc.) doesn’t miss a single one. By the time he’s finally shaken the dust from his feet, Reacher will have plumbed the depths of a monstrous unsolved crime, cleaned up the county and killed a lot of mostly nameless guys who really deserved it.

The Affair by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 16

The Affair by Lee Child, Jack Reacher series No. 16

Jack Reacher No. 16, The Affair

Plot Summary:

Child’s compelling 16th thriller featuring incorruptible vigilante Jack Reacher (after Worth Dying For) rewinds the clock to 1997 when Reacher was still a military cop and working on the case that led to his eventual break with the Army. Reacher must figure out whether the shocking murder of 27-year-old Janice May Chapman in Carter Crossing, Miss., has any connection with nearby Fort Kelham, where Army Rangers are trained. Reacher soon learns that two other women had their throats slit in the same way as Chapman, and the leading suspect is a Fort Kelham captain, whose father is a U.S. senator and diehard Army supporter. Reacher knows all too well the case has political trouble written all over it—and he and his Army bosses quickly butt heads over how it should be handled.

 

Jack Reacher Books I’ll Be Reading

I don’t know about you, but I think I’ll read Die Trying (No. 2), Running Blind (No. 4), The Enemy (No. 8), The Hard Way (No. 10), Bad Luck and Trouble (No. 11), Gone Tomorrow (No. 13), and The Affair (No. 16).  Then maybe I’ll go back and read One Shot (No. 9), but since the movie Jack Reacher is based on One Shot, I already know that storyline.  :)

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